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20110301
20110331
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> susie: japan in crisis. a massive earthquake rocks the asian nation. that unleashed a powerful tsunami pushing rivers of water through coastal cities and farmland. >> tom: with damages likely in the billions of dollars, we look at whether the crisis will derail japan's economic recovery and the global comeback. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 11. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everyone. a state of emergency in japan tonight. officials are still trying to assess the scope of the damage and casualties from that massive earthquake. susie, the magnitude of the quake 8.9 is the strongest on record in japan. >> susie: tom, it's still not clear what the devastating earthquake will do to japan's fragile economy and the global markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minut
>> susie: japan's unfolding nuclear crisis derails markets around the globe. the dow tumbled almost 300 points at the open. >> the global markets were very anxious. it was an absolute... i wouldn't call it a flight to safety; it was a flight to cash. it looked like people were desperate for liquidity. >> susie: market strategist mike holland and economist diane swonk weigh in with their analysis. you're watching "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 15. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off. japan is on high alert tonight as the country responds to yet another explosion at the daichi nuclear power plant. japan's prime minister warned of substantial radiation leaks. the ongoing threat of radioactive fallout led to a global market sell-off today. we have complete coverage, beginning in tokyo with correspondent
>> susie: investors face fear and confusion as japan's nuclear crisis continues. energy regulators around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of t
>> susie: the world watches japan as questions mount about the human tragedy and the potential damage to the global economic recovery. >> the global recovery will not be derailed by the events in japan, given everything we know today. >> susie: from the auto industry in japan to the future of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention aroun
: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besides japan's nuclear crisis a big spike in the japanese yen is creating a currency crisis. finance ministers from a
>> susie: from unrest in libya to uncertainty in japan, how the unknown is coloring the outlook for oil prices. >> tom: and we get the latest from japan, one week after its deadly earthquake and tsunami. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 18. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. president obama put libya on notice today saying the u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and w
. tom, investors took a break to process all of the continuing problems in japan and the middle east. >> tom: susie, all three of the major averages ended modestly down, and trading volume was the lowest of the year. >> susie: so, what's next for the u.s. stock market? suzanne pratt got some answers. >> reporter: on wall street, they're calling it the "teflon market". throw at stocks an earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis in japan, not to mention a war in libya, yet the dow is above 12,000. nyse broker ted weisberg is surprised by the market's resiliency. but says he finds the recent volatility very troubling. >> the volatility, to me, simply says that there's no confidence. yes, the market's had a dramatic move off the lows, but for the most part, this move has not be accompanied by a lot of volume on the upside of the swing. >> reporter: still, the question is whether stocks can maintain their non-stick status? experts say that will depend on the quality of corporate profits. we'll get that news starting in about three weeks. according to thomson reuters, which tracks earnings
slide. suzanne pratt, "nightly business report," new york. >> tom: in japan, the operator of a damaged nuclear power plant reports new setbacks in the effort to bring the facility under control. the plant's operator, tokyo electric power company, today reported that high levels of radiation are being found in the ocean about 100 yards offshore from the nuclear plant. and as lucy craft reports, contamination has dispersed well beyond the evacuated zone. >> reporter: for the beleaguered people of japan, there is a new menace. radiation contamination has been discovered in spinach, milk and tap water. officials say the levels don't pose a danger to human health, but they aren't taking any chances. today, the government slapped a ban on shipments of spinach from four states-- gunma, tochigi, ibaraki and fukushima, where the crippled nuclear power plant is located. milk from fukushima, the state which has borne the brunt of the radiation menace, has also been taken off the market. so far, japanese customers seem to be taking the news in stride. food sales overall are unaffected. but export
official estimate of the cost of the earthquake and tsunami. japan also said today radiation has spread beyond the area surrounding its crippled nuclear power plant. the city of tokyo says its drinking water isn't safe for infants because radiation levels are double safe limits. it's urging residents to refrain from hoarding bottled water. separately, toyota motor said it will halt some north american production because of parts shortages in japan. it's not sure how many shifts will be down, or for how long. >> tom: still ahead, as seen with this week's big telecom deal, big buyouts are alive and well, and that has tonight's "street critique" guest buying the bankers behind the buying. hilary kramer joins us. >> susie: a very big name on the witness stand today at the raj rajaratnam insider trading trial-- lloyd blankfein, c.e.o. of goldman sachs. blankfein testified that a former board member, rajat gupta, gave rajaratnam confidential information valued at $17 million-- tips about a possible acquisition of wachovia bank and the $5 billion investment in the firm by warren buffett's berk
, "nightly business report," new york. >> tom: japan continues to struggle to contain the world's worst nuclear crisis in 25 years. tokyo electric power, or tepco, runs the damaged fukushima nuclear complex and says more radioactive water was found leaking from the plant today. plutonium has also been found in soil around the plant. tepco has asked french nuclear giant areva for help with crisis. as for the auto industry, some analysts now say it could be summer before japan's vehicle makers are running at normal capacity. goldman sachs estimates the shutdowns cost the automakers $200 million a day. meanwhile, damage at japan's auto parts makers has ford motor idling a european plant. the plant in belgium will shut for five days starting monday, to conserve parts. and, if you want to order a ford f150 pickup, you might not get it in tuxedo black. ford has stopped taking orders for some specialty colors as a paint pigment supplier near japan's disaster zone remains closed. >> suzanne: a potential billion- dollar battle takes center stage at the supreme court tomorrow. it's a massive sex-
charged up over electric vehicles. >> tom: in japan, the owner of the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant, tokyo electric on america's nuclear power growth until new safety guidelines are put in place. in japan, meantime, lucy craft reports the owner of the fukushima power plant may soon be under management, the japanese government. >> reporter: reports here say the government may temporarily nationalize tepco, which is confronting tens of billions of dollars in compensation to residents, fishermen and farmers who have been dislocated by the radiation disaster. a government takeover would ensure the company could meet those obligations, analysts say. the complex operation to stabilize fukushima's six damaged and leaking reactors could drag on for weeks. this weekend, trace plutonium turned up on the site, raising more alarm. tepco is the region's largest utility, and provides power to a third of japan's population, but with most of its nuclear power and other energy plants sidelined by the earthquake, tokyo is confronting huge power shortages, especially this summer. the nationaliza
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)

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